Fracture Care

Fracture Care

A fracture is a broken bone. A bone may be completely fractured or partially fractured in any number of ways (crosswise, lengthwise, in multiple pieces). A significant percentage of bone fractures occur because of high force impact. However, a fracture may also be the result of some medical conditions which weaken the bones, for example osteoporosis, some cancers or osteogenesis imperfecta.

A fracture caused by a medical condition is known as a pathological fracture.

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Arthritis Care

Arthritis Care

Arthritis literally means "inflammation of a joint." In some forms of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis, the inflammation arises because the smooth covering (articular cartilage) on the ends of bones become damaged or worn. Osteoarthritis is usually found in one, usually weight-bearing, joint.

In other forms of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, the joint lining becomes inflamed as part of a disease process that affects the entire body. Some other types of arthritis are: seronegative spondyloarthropathies, crytalline deposition diseases, and septic arthritis.

Arthritis is a major cause of lost work time and serious disability for many people. Although arthritis is mainly a disease of adults, children may also have it.

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Knee Replacement

Knee Replacement

Your knee is the largest joint in your body. It is a "hinge-type" joint made up of three bones: the femur (thighbone), tibia (shinbone), and the patella (kneecap). The ends of these bones are covered with smooth white tissue called articular cartilage. This slippery surface helps your knee bones glide smoothly as you bend or straighten your leg. The menisci are located between the tibia and femur. These C-shaped wedges act as "shock absorbers" and stabilize and cushion the joint.

Four ligaments in your knee act like strong ropes to hold the bones together, keep your knee stable, and allow it to bend. These are:

  • The medial collateral ligament (MCL)
  • The lateral collateral ligament (LCL)
  • The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)
  • The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)

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Shoulder Replacement

Shoulder Replacement

Although shoulder joint replacement is less common than knee or hip replacement, it is just as successful in relieving joint pain. Shoulder replacement surgery was first performed in the United States in the 1950s to treat severe shoulder fractures. Over the years, shoulder joint replacement has come to be used for many other painful conditions of the shoulder, such as different forms of arthritis.

If nonsurgical treatments like medications and activity changes are no longer helpful for relieving pain, you may want to consider shoulder joint replacement surgery. Joint replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure to relieve pain and help you resume everyday activities.

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Hip Replacement

Hip Pain

The hip is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in your body. It is shaped like a ball and socket. The ball is the top of the thigh bone, which is called the femoral head. The socket, which is cup-shaped, is called the acetabulum. It sits in the pelvis. Many diseases can cause a painful hip. Some of these include:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Posttraumatic arthritis
  • Avascular necrosis
  • Childhood hip disease

Total hip replacement is the most common surgical procedure used to treat an arthritic hip. Other procedures such as partial or bipolar replacement, hip fusion, and surface replacement, are less common.

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Arthroscopic Surgery

Arthroscopic Surgery

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure orthopedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose, and treat problems inside a joint. During the procedure, your surgeon will make a very small incision and insert a tiny camera — called an arthroscope — into your joint. This allows them to view the inside of the joint on a screen. The surgeon can then investigate a problem with the joint and, if necessary, correct the issue using small instruments within the arthroscope.

The word arthroscopy comes from two Greek words, "arthro" (joint) and "skopein" (to look). The term literally means "to look within the joint."

Arthroscopy diagnoses several joint problems, such as a torn meniscus or a misaligned patella (kneecap). It can also repair the ligaments of the joint. In an arthroscopic examination, an orthopedic surgeon makes a small incision in the patient's skin and then inserts pencil-sized instruments that contain a small lens and lighting system to magnify and illuminate the structures inside the joint. Light is transmitted through fiber optics to the end of the arthroscope that is inserted into the joint.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition that causes pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and arm. The condition occurs when one of the major nerves to the hand — the median nerve — is squeezed or compressed as it travels through the wrist. In most patients, carpal tunnel syndrome gets worse over time, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. Early on, symptoms can often be relieved with simple measures like wearing a wrist splint or avoiding certain activities.

If pressure on the median nerve continues, however, it can lead to nerve damage and worsening symptoms. To prevent permanent damage, surgery to take pressure off the median nerve may be recommended for some patients.

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Trigger Finger Surgery

Trigger Finger

Trigger finger limits finger movement. When you try to straighten your finger, it will lock or catch before popping out straight.

Trigger finger is a condition that affects the tendons in your fingers or thumb

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Next Steps...

If you suffer from any of these conditions, we want to help.